I am having so many weird issues with the android->iOS transition. Like…why don’t my replies show in the thread in the mail app? I see the arrow indicating a reply but it’s not on the screen? Am I missing something obvious?

If anyone in the NYC area has HD recovery software and a HD reader PLEASE PLEASE let me try a recovery with your stuff. I’m pretty sure everything is gone but man, it’s all my work from the past 1.5 years and I’m totally devastated. It happened a few days ago and I’ve purposefully been avoiding thinking about it but now that I am I’m just devastated. I can’t believe all my work is gone. Professional work including hundreds of headshots, all my landscape work that I meant to print and sell this winter, all my writing, the original drafts of the chapbook I published this year. Like, if you have this equipment and software PLEASE let me know. I really don’t want to spend hundreds on a HD recovery app for it to just not work. 

Edit: A ton of people are telling me to use dropbox and whatnot. Bros. I know what dropbox is. I know I fucked up by not auto-backing up into the cloud. Here’s what happened: I backed up a laptop onto an external hard drive, and took the HD home intending to replicate the backup a million times when I got home on dropbox and elsewhere. By some horrifying act of God, the HD was inaccesible when I got home, even though I made extra sure to not bang it around. :(

Edit 2: I also want to mention I lost my tarot cards this fall so I’m just feeling super weird and like my important things are gone and i’m so bummed.

Edit 3: sherifr is going to take a stab at it!!! Will update when I have news.

man-and-camera
man-and-camera:

Hey! So I’ve received a bunch of questions asking how I take my star photos, so I’ve decided to make a post about it.
Basically to get the stars to be vibrant and not washed out, as well as the Milky Way to stand out brightly, you need several factors. Firstly, gear is actually very important in night photography.
As for gear, a good DSLR body, one which is capable of a high ISO without noise is vital. I shoot on 2500-3200 ISO. As for a lens, one which can go super wide, both in focal and in f/stop is just as important. I use a Canon L 20-35mm f/2.8, shot at 25 seconds on f/2.8 at 20mm focal.
When setting up your shot, you want to use the rule of 500. This is basically a simple rule to stop your stars being blurry due to the Earths rotation. Simply divide 500/your focal length. For example, since I shoot at 20mm, I do 500/20 = 25 seconds.
To get your shot in focus, you have two options. One, use your liveview and zoom in 10X on the brightest star you can find. Turn your focus to manual, and fiddle with it till the star is sharp. You’d think it’d be full back, but its not on most lens. Generally infinity is slightly back from full turn. Your other option is to crank the ISO to its highest settings, and take a photo, readjust the focus, and repeat till it’s right.
When planning a photo, location is crucial. I use cleardarksky.com to check weather, cloud clover and astronomical viewing for that night at that specific location. As well, I use the Dark Sky app on my iPhone to see the extent of light pollution surrounding the area I am. Pointing your lens in a direction of a big town, even if its 50+km away will affect your shot.
Finally, know which part of the night sky you’re shooting. For British Columbia during most of the summer, the Milkyway rises due south at approx. 11pm for an average estimate. It varies, but for most purposes that’s all I plan my shot on.  
Hope this helps!

I haven’t done any night sky photography but +1000 to using your live view+zoom+manual focus to check focus on a complicated shot. it’s easy to forget about when you’re surrounded by beauty and want to just snap away but trust me, having all those perfectly sharp images afterward is so worth it.

man-and-camera:

Hey! So I’ve received a bunch of questions asking how I take my star photos, so I’ve decided to make a post about it.

Basically to get the stars to be vibrant and not washed out, as well as the Milky Way to stand out brightly, you need several factors. Firstly, gear is actually very important in night photography.

As for gear, a good DSLR body, one which is capable of a high ISO without noise is vital. I shoot on 2500-3200 ISO. As for a lens, one which can go super wide, both in focal and in f/stop is just as important. I use a Canon L 20-35mm f/2.8, shot at 25 seconds on f/2.8 at 20mm focal.

When setting up your shot, you want to use the rule of 500. This is basically a simple rule to stop your stars being blurry due to the Earths rotation. Simply divide 500/your focal length. For example, since I shoot at 20mm, I do 500/20 = 25 seconds.

To get your shot in focus, you have two options. One, use your liveview and zoom in 10X on the brightest star you can find. Turn your focus to manual, and fiddle with it till the star is sharp. You’d think it’d be full back, but its not on most lens. Generally infinity is slightly back from full turn. Your other option is to crank the ISO to its highest settings, and take a photo, readjust the focus, and repeat till it’s right.

When planning a photo, location is crucial. I use cleardarksky.com to check weather, cloud clover and astronomical viewing for that night at that specific location. As well, I use the Dark Sky app on my iPhone to see the extent of light pollution surrounding the area I am. Pointing your lens in a direction of a big town, even if its 50+km away will affect your shot.

Finally, know which part of the night sky you’re shooting. For British Columbia during most of the summer, the Milkyway rises due south at approx. 11pm for an average estimate. It varies, but for most purposes that’s all I plan my shot on.  

Hope this helps!

I haven’t done any night sky photography but +1000 to using your live view+zoom+manual focus to check focus on a complicated shot. it’s easy to forget about when you’re surrounded by beauty and want to just snap away but trust me, having all those perfectly sharp images afterward is so worth it.

When you fly from New York City to Portland in the evening, you chase the sun around the globe for almost the entire flight. Like on the space station, they say the sunset lasts 45 minutes because it’s floating against the rotation of the Earth, following the sun around the corner. On this flight, the sky browns and deepens into purple, but it takes hours. It outruns you just in the last leg of the flight, and it is night time when you touch down.

When you fly from New York City to Portland in the evening, you chase the sun around the globe for almost the entire flight. Like on the space station, they say the sunset lasts 45 minutes because it’s floating against the rotation of the Earth, following the sun around the corner. On this flight, the sky browns and deepens into purple, but it takes hours. It outruns you just in the last leg of the flight, and it is night time when you touch down.

I’ve been using Ello for a couple of days now and wanted to write something about it. But the truth is it’s just too buggy to use. Even with a great deal of patience. I really tried but the interface breaks at every stop. Anyone else having the same experience?

queenofchalices

floozys:

there’s a lot of unspoken pressure to keep liking the things you used to like and to keep dressing the way you’ve always dressed and to never question what you believe in and basically “be yourself” has slowly morphed into “be what everyone knows you as” but trust me when i say if you just give it up and simply make decisions and take actions based purely on what would make you happy, you’ll gain a very comforting sense of self peace